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Council Co-Designed Information Governance Training

The Data Protection Act 2018 governs the way that public sector bodies share, process and handle data, and as such it is critical to ensure all staff fully understand the requirements. 

Whilst many will have had initial training when the GDPR and the wider regulations came into force, there is still some way to go instil confidence at all levels around information governance. 

To address this, eight councils have come together to co-design local government focused InfoGov training with BAFTA winning film-makers and education experts. 

Starting from an outline based on ICO guidance, Data Protection Officers and Information Governance Managers from across local government have worked through real life InfoGov processes and agreed clear steps around processing, sharing and managing data. 

The resulting nine modules cover: 

  • Data Confidence 
  • Data Type & Purpose  
  • Lawful Bases  
  • Special Category Conditions  
  • Impact  
  • Document & Notify  
  • Data Near Misses & How to Avoid Them  
  • Sharing Data Confidently  
  • Love That Data - coveringData 
  • Hygiene & Good Governance - and including Surveillance (CCTV, drones, body worn cameras, dashcams etc). 

This week a significant milestone was reached in that the scripts were signed off by the eight collaborating councils, meaning that production now begins to transform the words on the page into interactive, engaging videos and eLearning. 

The training will be animated in the same style as the Dojo series (https://cc2i.org.uk/products/all-products/dojo-local-government), and use proven methods to embed learning and best practice, whilst instilling confidence in all levels of staff. 

The nine new modules with supporting SCORM compliant eLearning will be delivered in March 2019, be accessible on any device and include subtitles. 

If you would like access to the scripts to understand what is covered and whether it might be relevant for your organisation, please get in touch withsam.hore@cc2i.org.uk 

The councils co-funding and co-designing the training include Blackpool, Derby, East Sussex, Gloucestershire, Oldham/GMCA, Portsmouth, Staffordshire and Warwickshire, and were brought together by the public sector collaboration platform, CC2i. 

 https://cc2i.org.uk 

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Local Gov Declaration Fund approved projects

We're excited to announce that an expert panel has awarded the first round of funding from the #LocalDigitalFund to 16 collaborative #localgov projects, spanning 57 #localgov councils. Read about how the decisions were made in the blog: https://mhclgdigital.blog.gov.uk/2018/12/07/selecting-the-first-local-digital-fund-projects/ #FixThePlumbing

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Friday roundup: A week in tech

I knew 5G was going to lead to trouble.

At the weekend, would-be global-5G-delivering-wonder-firm Huawei saw its founder’s daughter arrested in Canada, where she now awaits extradition to the Land of the, still just about, Free.

robin-worrall-749755-unsplash.jpg

Meng Wanzhou, who is also the firm’s chief financial officer and deputy chair, was swept up by the scuffers in connection with possible violations of the US’s determined sanctions against current enemy-of-the-month, Iran.

Predictably, China is incensed and the Chinese embassy in Canada is demanding the CFO’s release etc. Huawei, meanwhile, is, equally predictably, playing dumb over the accusations.

Huawei is increasingly becoming THE tech global pariah. Last week, New Zealand became the latest country to forbid the firm from bidding for 5G licenses, over concerns about where it ends and the Chinese government begins.

According to various news reports, the troubled company is under investigation by US investigative types over suspected violations of sanctions against both Iran and North Korea (how many countries is the US currently enforcing sanctions against? There can’t be many left).

Additionally, some in the US boss class believe Huawei is a threat to the country’s national security, which is very serious indeed.

Yet– all this and glaringly corrupt crime nebulae Facebook remains at large and unmolested! What do you think of that?

***

The socialist paradise of Cuba is to get a big bag of 3G this week, gifting perhaps millions of its citizens the opportunity to stare at a small rectangle for most of the day.

Until now, islanders have had to rely on weird, archaic, slightly spooky things like internet cafes, with most of the population spending their time doing whatever it was we did 15 years ago.

Wonderful as the opportunity to go on Twitter and have utterly unproductive spats with idiots is, it won’t come cheap: 3G provider Etecsa wants $7 a month for a measly 600mb, but the average monthly wage on the island is only $30 – so you’ll have to be particularly desperate to view Dave from Axis Chemicals LinkedIn update on motivational management techniques to sign up.

For a communist people-loving state, Cuba seems reasonably relaxed about its subjects going on the internet, at least according to the information I am literally reading while I write this. Internet cafes in 2013; WiFi hotspots in 2015; home connections in 2017. Give it another 200 years and they’ll be allowed to make jokes about the government.

Interestingly, Etecsa hasn’t ruled out the possibility of ‘glitches’ within its 3G fabric – which might be code for ‘don’t look at stuff you’re not supposed to’. We shall see.

***

If you’re an O2 user you may have noticed that everything’s broken and the world’s come to an end. Having said that, there’s probably a very slim chance you can read this at all, so it’s all a bit academic really.

The big network provider’s…um…network went horribly down yesterday, plunging millions of screen-gazers into pre-internet primordial darkness.

(Anecdotally, my work phone is O2 and my personal phone is giffgaff, which is powered by O2, and I noticed nothing untoward going on. Having said that, I only use them to occasionally check the weather and to see if Holland & Barrett have sent me my latest £1.50 discount voucher, so I don’t think I truly fit into the ‘deeply troubled’ demographic.)

And this is a rolling news story: O2 is still blundering in the dark as I type, but is ‘confident’ everything will be fine at some point tomorrow (Friday).

And it’s not just O2 users who are feeling the pain: the bungling firm powers a wide-range of services, such as live bus timetables and payment systems – many of which also crumbled into digital oblivion in the mess.

Chief exec Mark Evans reckons the problem has been isolated and all will return to normal, claiming: ‘We have hundreds of people from both Ericsson and O2 working around the clock to identify the issue. We are starting to restore the network this evening, and we’re confident. Ericsson have given the assurance that by tomorrow morning it will have been fully restored.’

Do you remember, oh, some months ago or something when Visa’s network fell flat on its face, too? That was quite ominous. Back in the day, TVs never just stopped working – and if they had of, it would’ve made little difference as they weren’t interactive: you just looked at them.

But today, our payment methods and, increasingly, how we interact with the material universe hangs on the whims of vast and complex digital systems – systems that it’s imaginable collapsing, taking our access to the world along with ‘em.

Have a good weekend!

By Max Salsbury

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Friday round-up: A week in tech

Regular followers of this round-up may have noticed that I have implied on occasion that popular time-wasting exercise Facebook is run like some kind of vast international crime network.

Well, wouldn’t you know – now it’s official (sort of)!

facebook-internet-login-267482

Appearing before a truly global hearing, and filling the giant and ominous gap left by elusive el capo Don Zuckerberg, Lord Richard Allan, Facebook’s vice-president of policy solutions, was told by MP Paul Farrelly that the thought that occurred to him was ‘racketeering’. Ouch.

Featuring inquisitive politicians from nine countries, and following the unprecedented seizure of a nest of Facebook documents by MPs on Monday, the committee grilled fall-guy-for-the-day Lord Allan – but were enraged and astonished by the continuing absence of boss M Zuckerberg.

The Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee tweeted: ‘9 countries. 24 official representatives. 447 million people represented. One question: where is Mark Zuckerberg?’

Where indeed. Ecuadorian embassy?

Canadian politician Charlie Angus joined in the fun, telling Lord Allan that ‘We’ve never seen anything quite like Facebook, where, while we were playing on our phones and apps, our democratic institutions…seem to have been upended by frat-boy billionaires from California’.

Well, quite.

So, what’s going on? Well, as you probably know by now, Facebook has an interesting relationship with its users’ data, and the fuss can really be distilled into a few words: Cambridge Analytica, Brexit, Trump, Russia.

And the event’s big reveal? Discovered amongst the seized documents was an email from all the way back in 2014 in which a Facebook engineer reported that huge amounts of user data were being pulled from the social network by Russian IP addresses.

Lord Allan didn’t seem to know much about any of this mischief and said he’d get back with more info. However, since then Facebook has said it looked into the matter at the time and ‘found no evidence of specific Russian activity’. Right.

In fact, Lord Allan didn’t seem to know much at all. He couldn’t name a single instance of his firm banning apps for breaking its rules; but later that day the Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham told the hearing that Facebook informed the ICO it had banned 200 apps during the past summer alone!

If you’re still a Facebook user, I’d enjoy it while you can. I don’t think it’s going to be around much longer.

***

Now, here’s a couple of stories about various things going on concerned with China, determined as I am to be put on a dark list in some file in Beijing.

New Zealand has joined the growing list of countries to ban the use of tech built by Chinese firm Huawei, citing national security concerns.

With 5G networks being set up across the world, poor old Huawei keeps getting the bum’s rush when it knocks on the door to see if anyone wants its communications wares.

Australia has already forbidden the company from its 5G fields, while the US, UK, Germany, Japan and Korea are looking into things very closely.

It’s feared that with the line between Huawei and the nosey Chinese government being blurred at best, any kit laid down by the firm could be used for spying etc.

But perhaps there’s some good news after all: Papua New Guinea isn’t fussed and is planning to go ahead and allow Huawei to build some internet for it. Back in the summer, Papa New Guinea’s government avowed to build its own version of Facebook, so perhaps Huawei/the Chinese government can help out there, too.

What next? This isn’t much of a story but it’s mildly amusing/sinister. An AI system in the Chinese city of Ningbo spotted someone jaywalking and displayed their face on a billboard to shame them.

The only problem with this otherwise terrific scheme was that the shamed individual, Dong Mingzhu, had actually only appeared in image form on the side of a bus.

Ningbo police laughed that the silly AI system/overlord had made a silly mistake when it spotted Ms Dong’s visage in an advert. Good times.

***

Burnt-tasting coffee hawkers Starbucks has introduced a massive shakeup of its tax policies and will henceforth dutifully and happily pay its fair share.

Only joking. What the firm has actually done is pledged to block access to pornography over its free WiFi in its US shops.

Apparently, you’re not actually allowed to use its wireless to watch porn anyway – but now the firm will explicitly block its consumption.

I assume you’re thinking what I’m thinking: who on Earth would watch porn in public, in a coffee shop of all things, anyway?

Well, according to Starbucks, which has yielded to anti-porn group Enough is Enough, ‘it occurs rarely’. Thank heavens.

Enough is Enough successfully pressured McDonald’s into making its WiFi porn-tight back in 2016, and is furious that Starbucks apparently broke an earlier promise to do the same.

The group said: ‘Starbucks continues to serve up free, unrestricted WiFi to its customers, opening the door for patrons to view graphic or obscene pornography, view or distribute child pornography (an illegal crime) or engage in sexual predation activity.’

And there’s already been a reaction. According to abysmal celebrity ‘news’ site TMZ, porn website YouPorn is so incensed by the move that it has banned Starbucks products from its…make sure I spell this correctly…offices.

Not sure this is proper news, but it’s got WiFi in it so that’ll do. In the meantime, as the proscription doesn’t appear to be in force in the UK, I suppose you should take care where you sit/who you sit next to/what you touch if you happen to be visiting Starbucks.

By Max Salsbury

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